Services

Coumadin Clinic

People who develop blood clots, an irregular heartbeat, had surgery, or suffered a heart attack or stroke may be prescribed a blood thinning medication called an anticoagulant.

Anticoagulants, such as Coumadin or warfarin by its generic name, help prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other blockages in veins and arteries. Many things can alter Coumadin’s effectiveness such as change in weight, activity level, diet, overall health, or other medications.

Physicians may refer patients taking an anticoagulant to St. Mary's Coumadin Clinic. The clinic sees 50 to 60 patients a day, providing anticoagulation management to more than 1,000 patients.
 
Anticoagulation management keeps patients safe and medication effective. Patients visit the clinic, staffed by registered nurses and overseen by a physician medical director, anywhere from weekly to monthly. On each visit, the staff does a quick, finger-prick blood test. Results are immediate and the patient’s dose can be adjusted accordingly. It’s a quick visit to protect the patient and make sure they’re getting the best from their medication.


Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery


Minimally invasive techniques

During minimally invasive surgery, surgeons reach the heart through an incision approximately two-inches long in the side of the chest, between the ribs. Patients are usually able to return home within a few days and to their normal routine after just a few weeks. Traditional open chest surgery requires a large incision down the middle of the patient's chest through bone and muscle. Recovery can take several weeks or months and the procedure typically leaves a 10-inch scar.


The benefits of minimally invasive heart surgery over traditional heart surgery

  • Smaller incision and scar
  • Reduced risk of infection
  • Less bleeding
  • Less pain
  • Less trauma to muscles
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Shorter recovery time


Heart conditions treated by St. Mary's minimally invasive heart surgery program

  • Congenital valve defects
  • Narrowing or blockage of valve
  • Heart murmurs
  • Cardiac tumors
  • Atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)
  • Thoracic and abdominal aneurysms


Candidates for minimally invasive heart surgery

Patients diagnosed with a heart valve defect or disease, heart murmur, irregular heartbeat, or cardiac tumors maybe candidates for minimally invasive surgery. Although minimally invasive surgery is an appropriate treatment option for many, each patient's situation is different. After a full assessment of diagnostic tests, Dr. Narrod determines if the patient is best treated using traditional or minimally invasive techniques, weighing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

 

Chest Pain Center

St. Mary’s Hospital and Medical Center received Chest Pain Center Accreditation from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC), an international not-for-profit organization dedicated to eliminating heart disease as the number one cause of death worldwide.  Hospitals earning SCPC accreditation achieve a higher level of expertise in dealing with patients who arrive with heart attack symptoms. To become an Accredited Chest Pain Center, St. Mary’s engaged in rigorous evaluation of its heart care processes, integrating healthcare’s most successful “best practices” to reduce the time from onset of a patient’s symptoms to diagnosis and treatment.

Coumadin Clinic

People who develop blood clots, an irregular heart beat, have had surgery or suffered a heart attack or stroke may be prescribed a blood thinning medication called an anticoagulant. These prescriptions, such as Coumadin, or warfarin by its generic name, help prevent heart attacks, strokes and other blockages in veins and arteries. Physicians may refer patients taking an anticoagulant to St. Mary’s Coumadin Clinic. A quick visit to protect the patient and make sure they’re getting the best from their medication is all it takes to manage anticoagulation for most patients.

For more information please call: 970-298-7153

When visiting the clinic Please use Parking Lot E (west side of hospital) and register at Entrance 4.


Electrophysiology Laboratory

Cardiac electrophysiology (EP) is the study of the heart's electrical system. Practiced for about 20 years, EP studies involve insertion of a heart catheter to diagnose irregular heartbeat, for treatment, or to perform procedures such as pacemaker implantation procedure, defibrillator insertion, or ablation.

Procedures available at St. Mary's Electrophysiology Lab include:

• Diagnostic Electrophysiology studies

• Radiofrequency ablations

• Pacemaker implants

• Cardiac resynchronization therapy for chronic congestive heart failure

• Implantable cardiac defibrillator device

• Loop recorder implantation

• Biventricular pacer/defibrillator implants

Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery

Open-heart surgery can be a life-saving but invasive procedure. Now some types of cardiac surgery can be performed without a large chest incision and lengthy recovery. St. Mary's offers heart valve repair and replacement surgery and other selected cardiac procedures using minimally invasive surgical techniques. These procedures include:

• Congenital valve defects

• Narrowing or blockage of valve

• Heart murmurs

• Cardiac tumors

• Atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)

• Thoracic and abdominal aneurysms

Patients diagnosed with a heart valve defect or disease, heart murmur, irregular heartbeat, or cardiac tumors maybe candidates for minimally invasive surgery. Although minimally invasive surgery is an appropriate treatment option for many, each patient's situation is different. After a full assessment of diagnostic tests, St. Mary’s can determine if the patient is best treated using traditional or minimally invasive techniques, weighing the advantages and disadvantages of each.